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Eddie

Just for frills

Hello people
I thought I would have a try at making a neck frill/ruffle - other ranks British Infantry - as shown in many pictures for our period - for example the famous 33rd recruiting party :





I have read the article by Robert Henderson on the 1812 website - but has anyone out there actually made one?
It would need to be detachable - and I assume it would be made from a fine linen, presumably attaching by tapes around the neck or to a collar piece - like a jabot.

Any ideas please ? I am sure its the sort of thing 18cty reenactors from across the Pond would know about.
Neibelungen

Usually  it's a fine  linen or cambric fabric (c 100-200 threads to  the inch) finely gathered  in 1/8 to 1/4" pleats  on to  a narrow 1/4"  tape band. Approx 3-4 times the length  of the opening  and  from 1 1/2" to  3" wide.  Occasionally found with tucks along  the length.
The  outer edge  is  usually very finely hemmed (2-3mm) and then the band  is whip stitched  onto  the opening slit.  
This allows  it to  be removed for washing and reattached.

The jabot approach is a complete theatre approach and only really used by  clergy and legal  profession in the 19th century.

See Sharon Ann Burnston: Fitting and Proper, for some detailed examples  on extant items.
Eddie

Thanks Neibelungen - that's exactly the sort of detail I needed -
I don't have a copy of Sharon Burnstons book but I can understand your description so that a great help.
Ben Townsend

Have you seen the mention of ruffles in The Green Book Eddie? It details when and where I believe.
The 1808 SO of the 13th require that nay soldier wearing a shirt frill be instantly confined and said article publically burnt. I'm not sure if this is indicative of a prevailing fashion trend, or merely the Colonel's fashion sense carried to draconian  lengths!
Eddie

ben wrote:
Have you seen the mention of ruffles in The Green Book Eddie? It details when and where I believe.
The 1808 SO of the 13th require that nay soldier wearing a shirt frill be instantly confined and said article publically burnt. I'm not sure if this is indicative of a prevailing fashion trend, or merely the Colonel's fashion sense carried to draconian  lengths!


Hello Ben
No I havn't seen the Green Book entry re ruffles - but our unit guidelines mention wearing them with the top three buttons undone - presumably we could wear them "walking out" - hence my interest in detachables.
Could the 13th Foot SO be as a result of soldiers disguising dirty shirts by putting on a detachable frill - as commented on in Robert Hendersons' article?  'the said article publically burnt" indicates a removable item from the shirt itself.
Ben Townsend

Search for the Green Book reference in the research archive. Its there Smilie_PDT  So is the 13th SO bit. It indicates a sort of detachable shirt front that can be applied to conceal a dirty shirt. Cool, eh?
Eddie

ben wrote:
Search for the Green Book reference in the research archive. Its there Smilie_PDT  So is the 13th SO bit. It indicates a sort of detachable shirt front that can be applied to conceal a dirty shirt. Cool, eh?


Hello Ben
Can't find any detail in the reference archive  - just a topic title referring to the existence of the Green book. PM me if you can point me in the right direction.
Cheers
Eddie

Standing Orders 85th L I 1813  PAGE 89/90:



"His regimental suit, great coat and straps, pack and cap. His undress jacket, trowsers, and short gaiters; three white shirts and two false frills;two flannel waistcoats, two pair of good half boots, two pair of socks, and two towels; a comb, razor, clothes and shoe brushes, buff stick, button stick and brush, blacking ball, piece of soap, and sponge. "
Ben Townsend

Inspection report for 29th regiment, Dec 1815, Versailles, near Paris.

'The appearance of this fine body of men is hurt, by the manner of putting on the accoutrements, the belts crossing low to make for an appearance of finery in a dirty stiff frill.'


p.221 The Correspondence of Sir Henry Clinton in the Waterloo Campaign, vol ii
edited by Gareth Glover, Ken Trotman, 2015

And again,

'I could not help observing to Colonel Parker that the custom of showing so much of the shirt frill had introduced that of making the belts cross too low on the soldier's body, the belts should cross in the centre of the chest.

p.226 ibid
Ben Townsend

Costumes estrangeres in the Bibliotheque Nationale has many images of British wearing frills during the occupation, so it must have still been current practice in 1815.




Eddie

Great stuff there Ben - seems even the ordinary soldier liked to cut a dash at the expense of wearing equipment belts wrongly. The image is fascinating - with all the problematic inclusions so often found with the occupation prints - white stripes on grey trousers -  is that supposed to be an HLI man?  Wrong facings of course - but is that cap a Belgic? It certainly appears a stepped profile.

And the Highlander - notice how short the kilt is. The re enactor Highlander tends to wear the Kilt drooping below the knee like a tartan sack - wrong even by modern standards of Hielan dress.
OJM

For some reason I've always envisioned the soldiers false frill as being a vertical strip with a buttonhole at the top that goes onto the shirt button and is hidden beneath the stock/neckerchief? Tried finding an image now to illustrate, but no luck, so may just have dreamt it up?
Richard Warren

Happened to drop in today to the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders Museum at Stirling Castle, where a display states firmly that the kilt was then worn just above the knee - though admittedly not quite at mini-skirt level as in that image.

Also on show there was a period kilt in "hard tartan" cloth - tight weave, shiny, a bit like gabardine, and water resistant, not at all like modern tartan. But we digress ...
Ben Townsend

I have a copy of Sharon Ann Burnston: Fitting and Proper, as mentioned by Neibelungen above. It has notes for constructing shirt frills to be attached to the shirt. If anyone wants to see them lmk.

Ola, I know what you mean about the button. I had that thought in my head too. I'm keeping my eyes peeled for references.
Neibelungen

Worth having a read  of the standing  orders for the  106th regiment.  Although dated  1803, in it's section on dress  for O/R's  it makes a point of  noting the  coat to hook through the  shirt frills, for which buttonholes were worked in them for the purpose.
Ben Townsend

Standing orders 1795 for the 106th available here,

https://books.google.co.uk/books?...v=onepage&q=frill&f=false

p.28
Neibelungen

Thanks...  confusing  it with the 3rd dragoon one  in my references lists.
OJM

Ben: would very much like the images?
Ben Townsend

Neck ruff 1810-1825 Snowshill collection
Ben Townsend

Bugler Edwards and Private Townsend with theirs standing proudly out at Waterloo 2015. Five minutes after this Prince Charles came by and saluted us.



Ben Townsend

There appears to be a world of extravagance to explore in the vagaries of frills, ruffles, and rumbelows (is that a word?) These fellows have ledt modesty far behind, cantered merrily past flamboyant, and taken excess vigorously by the throat.


Eddie

ben wrote:
Bugler Edwards and Private Townsend with theirs standing proudly out at Waterloo 2015. Five minutes after this Prince Charles came by and saluted us.






'Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree - damned from here to eternity'

Happy days Ben.

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